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Bookswithtea
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 10:17am | IP Logged Quote Bookswithtea

I have a child who is going to be doing Sonlight's core 5. I've done this core before and have substitutes for several of the "hero tales". They've added a new book about a protestant missionary who worked in Africa. I'd like to replace it with a Catholic missionary who worked in Africa or even better, an African Catholic who worked with his or her own people. I need something at a middle school reading level...She's a strong reader but I don't want the maturity level of a high school level book.

Any ideas?

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missionfamily
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 10:33am | IP Logged Quote missionfamily

Books--The Encounter the Saints series has this one about St. Josephine Bakhita of Sudan...I don't know how it compares to her reading level.

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Matilda
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 11:06am | IP Logged Quote Matilda

St. Josephine Bakhita was from the Sudan but after she was taken from her home, I don't think she ever went back.

I found this website when my daughter was looking for information about St. Josephine. I don't know anything about them other than the information they offer on African Saints.

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Mattie
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 11:33am | IP Logged Quote Mattie

I don't have a link but i remember from I was a kid listening to a tape about the martyrs of Uganda. They were several page boys to the king who refused to give in to paganism and immorality and were martyred. I don't how appropriate their story would be for your children but I remember that it made a lasting impact in my life. The pagemaster's name was Charles Llangua (spelling?)
But just a beautiful story.

I am not sure if you can find it here in the us.

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Bookswithtea
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 11:58am | IP Logged Quote Bookswithtea

I found this book on Amazon

http://www.amazon.com/Saints-Africa-Vincent-J-OMalley/dp/087 973373X

I have no idea about the reading level or appropriateness for a middle schooler, though. I don't suppose anyone has read it????

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Rachel May
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 12:24pm | IP Logged Quote Rachel May

Luanga or Lwanga are two spellings of his name, Mattie.   

I put this on my amazon wishlist. The alibris description makes it sound like it is better for my kids than a middle schooler, though.

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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 1:00pm | IP Logged Quote Waverley

If you go to the website for Black Catholics, they have a list of saints who were either black or worked on behalf of black people.   It is a nice site. I just googled black catholics. It think it is a USCCB site.
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SylviaB
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 1:22pm | IP Logged Quote SylviaB

One of our favorite Catholic Mosaic books A Saint and His Lion by Elaine Murray Stone. It may be a good starting place to learn about this saint. He is remembered as a Saint by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church.

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Maddie
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 4:15pm | IP Logged Quote Maddie

I don't have a book title to offer, just a search word. The White Fathers and White Sisters worked to spread the Faith in Africa at one time and many were martyred. Maybe you could do a search of the White Fathers/Sisters. I have a dear friend who was a White Sister for a time in the 50's.


One of the most incredible stories she ever told me was of a little African baby who was dying in the village. The village was Muslim so the White Sisters were not allowed to evangelize, they were only allowed to provided medical care. The custom of this village was to lay the dying child down and the women of the village sat in a circle around it and mourned. A dear White Sister decided she was going to baptize that baby, so she dipped the hem of her dress in a bucket of water, walked over to the baby and let the water drip over his head while she said the holy words of baptism. That little boy became a saint in front of their eyes! If she had been caught, it would have meant death.

White Fathers are mentioned in the Treasure Box books. Not sure if this helps, but FWIW.

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Michaela
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 4:48pm | IP Logged Quote Michaela

Maddie wrote:
I don't have a book title to offer, just a search word. The White Fathers and White Sisters worked to spread the Faith in Africa at one time and many were martyred. Maybe you could do a search of the White Fathers/Sisters.


The site Waverley mentioned has info on The White Fathers.Martyrs of Uganda

Also Catholic Online has info: St. Charles Lwanga and Companions Martyrs of Uganda


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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 6:42pm | IP Logged Quote JennGM

The Daughters of St. Paul had an older series of Encounter Books, and African Triumph was about Charles Llwanga. I found a used copy here. The books used to say, for reading from 9 to 90. For a good reader, easily devoured. I still love reading those old series of books.

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Alison
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Posted: Feb 17 2009 at 8:20pm | IP Logged Quote Alison

Saint Moses the Black (330 405), known as the Ethiopian or the strong, was a slave of a government official in Egypt who dismissed him for theft and suspected murder. He became the leader of a gang of bandits who roamed the Nile Valley spreading terror and violence. He was a large, imposing figure. On one occasion, a barking dog prevented Moses from carrying out a robbery, so he swore vengeance on the owner. Weapons in his mouth, Moses swam the river toward the owner's hut. The owner, again alerted, hid, and the frustrated Moses took some of his sheep to slaughter. Attempting to hide from local authorities, he took shelter with some monks in a colony in the desert of Scetes, near Alexandria. The dedication of their lives, as well as their peace and contentment, influenced Moses deeply. He soon gave up his old way of life, became a Christian, was baptized and joined the monastic community at Scetes.
Moses had a rather difficult time adjusting to regular monastic discipline. His flair for adventure remained with him. Attacked by a group of robbers in his desert cell, Moses fought back, overpowered the intruders, and dragged them to the chapel where the other monks were at prayer. He told the brothers that he didn't think it Christian to hurt the robbers and asked what he should do with them. The overwhelmed robbers repented, were converted, and themselves joined the community.
Moses was zealous in all he did, but became discouraged when he concluded he was not perfect enough. Early one morning, Saint Isidore, abbot of the monastery, took Moses to the roof and together they watched the first rays of dawn come over the horizon. Isidore told Moses, "Only slowly do the rays of the sun drive away the night and usher in a new day, and thus, only slowly does one become a perfect contemplative."
Moses proved to be effective as a prophetic spiritual leader. The abbot ordered the brothers to fast during a particular week. Some brothers came to Moses, and he prepared a meal for them. Neighboring monks reported to the abbot that Moses was breaking the fast. When they came to confront Moses, they changed their minds, saying "You did not keep a human commandment, but it was so that you might keep the divine commandment of hospitality." Some see in this account one of the earliest allusions to the Paschal fast, which developed at this time.
When a brother committed a fault and Moses was invited to a meeting to discuss an appropriate penance, Moses refused to attend. When he was again called to the meeting, Moses took a leaking jug filled with water and carried it on his shoulder. Another version of the story has him carrying a basket filled with sand. When he arrived at the meeting place, the others asked why he was carrying the jug. He replied, "My sins run out behind me and I do not see them, but today I am coming to judge the errors of another." On hearing this, the assembled brothers forgave the erring monk.
Moses became the spiritual leader of a colony of hermits in the Western Desert. Later, he was ordained a priest. At about age 75, about the year 405 AD, word came that a group of Berbers planned to attack the monastery. The brothers wanted to defend themselves, but Moses forbade it. He told them to retreat, rather than take up weapons. He and seven others remained behind and greeted the invaders with open arms, but all eight were martyred by the bandits on 24 Paoni (July 1). A modern interpretation honors Saint Moses the Black as an apostle of non-violence. His relics and major shrine are found today at the Church of the Virgin Mary in the Paromeos Monastery.

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