Oh, Dearest Mother, Sweetest Virgin of Altagracia, our Patroness. You are our Advocate and to you we recommend our needs. You are our Teacher and like disciples we come to learn from the example of your holy life. You are our Mother, and like children, we come to offer you all of the love of our hearts. Receive, dearest Mother, our offerings and listen attentively to our supplications. Amen.



Active Topics || Favorites || Member List || Search || About Us || Help || Register || Login
Living Literature
 4Real Forums : Living Literature
Subject Topic: Seasonal Poems Post ReplyPost New Topic
Author
Message << Prev Topic | Next Topic >>
SuzanneG
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: June 17 2006
Location: Idaho
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 5465
Posted: Jan 29 2009 at 11:37am | IP Logged Quote SuzanneG

I'd like to start an on-going thread of Seasonal Poems that you choose for your children for memorization throughout the year.   I tend to pick poems that have to do with that particular season in nature, holidays and the liturgical year, and thought it would be fun if others did this to share our picks.

Also, if there are on-line sources that you use to find poems, please link them here. I use the poetry books that I have on hand, but one on-line-source I use often is Ambleside Online Poetry Anthology...the poems are written out after the monthly listing, or you can click on the month like these for February.

For my own perusal, I like The Poets' Corner.

Our current poems are obviously for WINTER, and the two that I chose for my older two for the month of Jan/Feb.

THE SNOW
,    F. Ann Elliott 
The snow, in bitter cold,
Fell all the night;
And we awoke to see
The garden white.

And still the silvery flakes
Go whirling by,
White feathers fluttering
From a gray sky.

Beyond the gate,
soft feet In silence go,
Beyond the frosted pane
White shines the snow.


WINTER JOYS, by Dorothy Gradon
White stars falling gently,
Softly down to earth.
Red fires burning brightly,
In the cozy hearth.

White trees changed to elfin-land,
By red sun's dazzling glow,
Little Robin redbreasts
Hopping in the snow.

Happy children's voices,
Shouting loud with glee,
Oh! the joys of winter
are wonderful to me!


I'm also starting my 5 yo on this poem, she's doing 2 lines a month:

A Calendar, by Sara Coleridge

January brings the snow,
Makes our feet and fingers glow.

February brings the rain,
Thaws the frozen lake again.

March brings breezes, loud and shrill,
To stir the dancing daffodil.

April brings the primrose sweet,
Scatters daisies at our feet.

May brings flocks of pretty lambs
Skipping by their fleecy dams.

June brings tulips, lilies, roses,
Fills the childrens hands with posies.

Hot July brings cooling showers,
Apricots and gillyflowers.

August brings the sheaves of corn,
Then the harvest home is borne.

Warm Septemper brings the fruit;
Sportsmen then begin to shoot.

Fresh October brings the pheasant;
Then to gather nuts is pleasant.

Dull November brings the blast;
Then the leaves are whirling fast.

Chill December brings the sleet,
Blazing fire, and Christmas treat.


__________________
Suzanne in ID
Wife to Pete
Mom of 7 (Girls - 14, 12, 11, 9, 7 and Boys - 4, 1)
Back to Top View SuzanneG's Profile Search for other posts by SuzanneG
 
MaryM
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Avatar

Joined: Feb 11 2005
Location: Colorado
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 13104
Posted: Jan 29 2009 at 12:30pm | IP Logged Quote MaryM

A short one for Candlemas:

If Candlemas be fair and bright,
Come, Winter, have another flight;
If Candlemas bring clouds and rain,
Go, Winter, and come not again.

__________________
Mary M. in Denver

Our Domestic Church
Back to Top View MaryM's Profile Search for other posts by MaryM Visit MaryM's Homepage
 
Rachel May
Forum All-Star
Forum All-Star


Joined: June 24 2005
Location: Kansas
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 2057
Posted: Jan 29 2009 at 12:59pm | IP Logged Quote Rachel May

My kids are going to start memorizing the sonnets that (possibly) Vivaldi wrote to go with his 4 Seasons. While looking for them, I found this resource:

Arts Alive Vivaldi's 4 Seasons

Here are the sonnets:

Spring
Allegro

Springtime is upon us.
The birds celebrate her return with festive song,
and murmuring streams are softly caressed by the breezes.
Thunderstorms, those heralds of Spring, roar, casting their dark mantle over heaven,
Then they die away to silence, and the birds take up their charming songs once more.


Largo
On the flower-strewn meadow, with leafy branches rustling overhead, the goat-herd sleeps, his faithful dog beside him.


Allegro
Led by the festive sound of rustic bagpipes, nymphs and shepherds lightly dance beneath the brilliant canopy of spring.

Summer
Allegro non molto

Under a hard Season, fired up by the Sun
Languishes man, languishes the flock and burns the pine
We hear the cuckoo's voice; then sweet songs of the turtledove and finch are heard.
Soft breezes stir the air... but threatening north wind sweeps them suddenly aside.
The shepherd trembles, fearing violent storms and his fate.


Adagio e piano - Presto e forte
The fear of lightning and fierce thunder
Robs his tired limbs of rest
As gnats and flies buzz furiously around.


Presto
Alas, his fears were justified
The Heavens thunders and roar and majestically
Cuts the head off the wheat and damages the grain.

Autumn

Allegro
Celebrates the peasant, with songs and dances,
The pleasure of a bountiful harvest.
And fired up by Bacchus' liquor, many end their revelry in sleep.


Adagio molto
Everyone is made to forget their cares and to sing and dance
By the air which is tempered with pleasure
And (by) the season that invites so many, many
Out of their sweetest slumber to fine enjoyment


Allegro
The hunters emerge at the new dawn,
And with horns and dogs and guns depart upon their hunting
The beast flees and they follow its trail;
Terrified and tired of the great noise
Of guns and dogs, the beast, wounded, threatens
Languidly to flee, but harried, dies.


Winter
Allegro non molto

To tremble from cold in the icy snow,
In the harsh breath of a horrid wind;
To run, stamping one's feet every moment,
Our teeth chattering in the extreme cold


Largo
Before the fire to pass peaceful,
Contented days while the rain outside pours down.


Allegro
We tread the icy path slowly and cautiously, for fear of tripping and falling.
Then turn abruptly, slip, crash on the ground and, rising, hasten on across the ice lest it cracks up.
We feel the chill north winds course through the home despite the locked and bolted doors...
this is winter, which nonetheless brings its own delights.

__________________
Rachel
Thomas and Anthony (10), Maria (8), Charles (6), Cecilia (5), James (3), and Joseph (1)
Back to Top View Rachel May's Profile Search for other posts by Rachel May
 
MaryM
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Avatar

Joined: Feb 11 2005
Location: Colorado
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 13104
Posted: Jan 29 2009 at 5:00pm | IP Logged Quote MaryM

Maggie just started this thread, so I'm linking it here
Candlemas Poetry

__________________
Mary M. in Denver

Our Domestic Church
Back to Top View MaryM's Profile Search for other posts by MaryM Visit MaryM's Homepage
 
Mackfam
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Avatar
Non Nobis

Joined: April 24 2006
Location: Alabama
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 14656
Posted: Jan 29 2009 at 5:27pm | IP Logged Quote Mackfam

SuzanneG wrote:

THE SNOW
,    F. Ann Elliott

WINTER JOYS, by Dorothy Gradon



I'm laughing because we're memorizing the same poetry for winter here! I bet we're working from the same book!

I love choosing poetry with seasonal themes! This will be a lovely thread for pulling and adding ideas!

We're also working on:

The Months by Christina Rosetti

January cold and desolate;
February dripping wet;
March wind ranges;
April changes;
Birds sing in tune
To flowers of May,
And sunny June
Brings longest day;
In scorched July
The storm clouds fly,
Lightning-torn;
August bears corn,
September fruit;
In rough October
Earth must disrobe her;
Stars fall and shoot
In keen November;
And night is long
And cold is strong
In bleak December.

White Fields by James Stephens

1.
In the winter time we go
Walking in the fields of snow;

Where there is no grass at all;
Where the top of every wall,

Every fence and every tree,
Is as white as white can be.

2.
Pointing out the way we came,
Everyone of them the same-

All across the fields there be
Prints in silver filigree;

And our mothers always know,
By our footprints in the snow,

Where the children go.

(and I feel like no seasonal thread on wintry poetry would be complete without...)

Stopping By Woods On a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost
Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

The little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely and dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep.
And miles to go before I sleep.


__________________
Jen Mackintosh
Wife to Rob, mom to dd 19, ds 16, ds 11, dd 8, and dd 3
Wildflowers and Marbles
Back to Top View Mackfam's Profile Search for other posts by Mackfam Visit Mackfam's Homepage
 
Sarah M
Forum All-Star
Forum All-Star


Joined: Jan 06 2008
Location: Washington
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1423
Posted: Jan 29 2009 at 7:20pm | IP Logged Quote Sarah M

My 7yo and 5yo are reciting a lot of Robert Louis Stevenson this year. I don't usually have them learn an entire poem- just an inspiring stanza or two. The 3yo usually ends up being able to recite as well, after hearing the girls time and time again.

With all the rain we've been having, we decided on this one for January:

Rain by Robert Louis Stevenson

The rain is raining all around
It falls on field and tree
It rains on the umbrellas here
And on the ships at sea

And for February...

Picture Books in Winter by Robert Louis Stevenson

Summer fading, winter comes-
Frosty mornings, tingling thumbs,
Window robins, winter rooks,
And the picture storybooks.

We may see how all things are
Seas and cities, near and far,
And the flying fairies' looks,
In the picture storybooks.

Back to Top View Sarah M's Profile Search for other posts by Sarah M
 
SuzanneG
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: June 17 2006
Location: Idaho
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 5465
Posted: Feb 08 2009 at 11:12pm | IP Logged Quote SuzanneG

Mackfam wrote:
     I'm laughing because we're memorizing the same poetry for winter here! I bet we're working from the same book!

    I think I got those from the Book of 1000 Poems.

Sarah M wrote:
Picture Books in Winter by Robert Louis Stevenson

I need another Feb. one, so they'll do this one too! Thanks for saving me some "looking up" time!

__________________
Suzanne in ID
Wife to Pete
Mom of 7 (Girls - 14, 12, 11, 9, 7 and Boys - 4, 1)
Back to Top View SuzanneG's Profile Search for other posts by SuzanneG
 
missionfamily
Forum All-Star
Forum All-Star
Avatar

Joined: April 10 2007
Location: Louisiana
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1859
Posted: Feb 09 2009 at 7:34am | IP Logged Quote missionfamily

I needed to move on from snowy, wintery poems as it really is feeling much more like spring here these days. I didn't want spring poetry though, so I chose a moon poem to go with our astronomy theme for the month:

Silver

Slowly, silently, now the moon
Walks the night in her silver shoon;
This way, and that, she peers, and sees
Silver fruit upon silver trees;
One by one the casements catch
Her beams beneath the silvery thatch;
Couched in his kennel, like a log,
With paws of silver sleeps the dog;
From their shadowy coat the white breasts peep
Of doves in a silver-feathered sleep;
A harvest mouse goes scampering by,
With silver claws, and silver eye;
And moveless fish in the water gleam,
By silver reeds in a silver stream.

- Walter de la Mare



__________________
Colleen
dh Greg
mom to Quinn,Gabriel, Brendan,Evan, Kolbe, and sweet St. Bryce

Footprints on the Fridge
Back to Top View missionfamily's Profile Search for other posts by missionfamily Visit missionfamily's Homepage
 
Mackfam
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Avatar
Non Nobis

Joined: April 24 2006
Location: Alabama
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 14656
Posted: Feb 09 2009 at 8:25am | IP Logged Quote Mackfam

We're moving on here as well...though I'm probably the only person in the entire world who actually laments the moving on of winter. Here in North Alabama though, we usually get a taste of spring around now, and then a furious blast of winter in March (right about the time I'm actually ready for spring).

Just for reference sake - I must have about 10 great poetry books, but my absolute favorite, my go-to is Favorite Poems Old and New. This is one of my -- if the house were burning I'd grab this book -- books.

Because we're focusing on birds and nesting, our poetry reflects that right now...

What Robin Told
by George Cooper

How do robins build their nests?
   Robin Redbreast told me-
First a wisp of yellow hay
In a pretty round they lay;
Then some shreds of downy floss,
Feathers, too, and bits of moss,
Woven with a sweet, sweet song,
This way, that way, and across;
   That's what Robin told me.

Where do robins hide their nests?
   Robin Redbreast told me-
Up among the leaves so deep,
Where the sunbeams rarely creep,
Long before the winds are cold,
Long before the leaves are gold,
Bright-eyed stars will peep and see
Baby robins-one, two, three;
   That's what Robin told me.

The Brown Thrush
by Lucy Larcom

There's a merry brown thrush sitting up in the tree,
He's singing to me! He's singing to me!
And what does he say, little girl, little boy?
"Oh, the world's running over with joy!
Don't you hear? Don't you see:
Hush! Look! In my tree,
I'm as happy as happy can be!"

And the brown thrush keeps singing, "A nest do you see,
And five eggs hid by me in the juniper tree?
Don't meddle! Don't touch, little girl, little boy,
Or the world will lose some of its joy!
Now I'm glad! Now I'm free!
And I always shall be,
If you never bring sorrow to me."

So the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree,
To you and to me, to you and to me;
And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy,
"Oh, the world's running over with joy!
But long it won't be,
Don't you know? Don't you see?
Unless we're as good as can be!"

(This poem by Lucy Larcom has sprung an entire rabbit trail for us on handling God's creatures and nature treasures carefully and with respect for the gentle creatures. We've been working on it for a couple of weeks and it fits perfectly just before a lovely spring study of birds and birding and the inevitable finding of a nest!)

for my little guy...
The Chickadee
by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Piped a tiny voice hard by,
Gay and polite, a cheerful cry,
"Chic-chicadee-dee!" Saucy note
out of a sound heart and a merry throat,
As if it said, "Good day, good sir.
Fine afternoon, old passenger!
Happy to meet you in these places
When January brings new faces!"

__________________
Jen Mackintosh
Wife to Rob, mom to dd 19, ds 16, ds 11, dd 8, and dd 3
Wildflowers and Marbles
Back to Top View Mackfam's Profile Search for other posts by Mackfam Visit Mackfam's Homepage
 
SarahA
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie
Avatar

Joined: April 12 2008
Location: North Carolina
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 42
Posted: Feb 26 2009 at 8:17pm | IP Logged Quote SarahA

Any poems for Lent? I checked The Poets Corner for both "Lent" and "Lenten" but found nothing appropriate for the season. We work on 1 poem per month, so I thought that could be for March. Maybe we'll just do some scripture or prayers if I can't find anything...neither are bad alternatives!

__________________
Sarah
Army wife, Mama to (so far...) 2 boys, 1 girl, then 2 more boys
Back to Top View SarahA's Profile Search for other posts by SarahA
 
SylviaB
Forum Pro
Forum Pro


Joined: June 19 2008
Location: Ohio
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 288
Posted: Feb 26 2009 at 9:09pm | IP Logged Quote SylviaB

Mackfam wrote:
We're moving on here as well...though I'm probably the only person in the entire world who actually laments the moving on of winter.


Me too!!
Back to Top View SylviaB's Profile Search for other posts by SylviaB
 
SuzanneG
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: June 17 2006
Location: Idaho
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 5465
Posted: Feb 26 2009 at 10:26pm | IP Logged Quote SuzanneG

We saw Donna Cori-Gibson in concert this weekend, and she sang lots of songs from her Prayers of the Great Saints album. One of my favorites from this album, that I thought would be good to memorize during Lent, is:

Prayer of St. Richard of Chichester

Thanks be to thee, my Lord Jesus Christ,
For all the benefits which thou hast won for me,
For all the pains and insults which thou hast borne for me.
O most merciful Redeemer, Friend and Brother,
May I know thee more clearly,
           Love thee more dearly,
           And follow thee more nearly:
           Day by day.

--St. Richard Chichester (1197-1253)       His feast day is coming up too......April 3.

****************************Here's a poem by children's book author Joyce Denham: (I don't' know the title)

O Christ, you calm the storm at sea;
In tempest sore, be calming me.

O Christ, you walk upon the wave;
When sinking fast, my footing save.

O Christ, the stricken child you raise;
My spirit lift in joy and praise.

O Christ, you heal the man born blind;
Make bright the darkness in my mind.

O Christ, you feed the crowd with bread;
With words of truth let me be fed.

O Christ, you make the water wine;
Take humble gifts and make them fine.

O Christ, the resurrection morn,
With your new life my life adorn.
     ~Joyce Denham


*********************** Focusing on the "stillness" of Lent:

O let us feel you very near
When we kneel down to pray.
Let us be still that you may send
A message for today.
     ~Annonymous

__________________
Suzanne in ID
Wife to Pete
Mom of 7 (Girls - 14, 12, 11, 9, 7 and Boys - 4, 1)
Back to Top View SuzanneG's Profile Search for other posts by SuzanneG
 
Stephanie_Q
Forum Pro
Forum Pro
Avatar

Joined: Aug 25 2007
Location: Nebraska
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 479
Posted: Feb 28 2009 at 7:02pm | IP Logged Quote Stephanie_Q

SarahA wrote:
Any poems for Lent? I checked The Poets Corner for both "Lent" and "Lenten" but found nothing appropriate for the season. We work on 1 poem per month, so I thought that could be for March. Maybe we'll just do some scripture or prayers if I can't find anything...neither are bad alternatives!


Another option: A Lenten Hymn.
I was reading from the end of The Passion and the Death of Jesus Christ by St. Alphonsus de Liguori last night and am thinking of the Hymns he wrote.

Here is a link for Marian Poetry These are sorted by seasons, months, etc. (including Lent, Passion, Easter...)

For the youngest I think something like "The Caterpillar" by Christina G. Rossetti fits with a gentle explanation of Jesus death and resurrection, though it might be a little early, "seasonally".

__________________
Stephaniedh 6.01
dd 6.02, dd 8.03, ds 3.05, ds 12.06 at Catholic school.
dd 12.09 at home.
Baby boy due 10.13
Back to Top View Stephanie_Q's Profile Search for other posts by Stephanie_Q Visit Stephanie_Q's Homepage
 
SuzanneG
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: June 17 2006
Location: Idaho
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 5465
Posted: March 12 2009 at 12:34am | IP Logged Quote SuzanneG

Early Spring Poems~

Crocuses
A kind voice call, “Come, little ones,
'Tis time to wake from sleeping!”
And out of bed without a word
The drowsy folk come creeping,
And, soon above the chilly earth
Their tiny heads are peeping.

They bravely face the wind of March,
Its bite and bluster scorning
Like little soldiers—till, oh joy!
With scarce a word of warning
The crocuses slip off their caps
And give us gay good morning.
~Anna M. Platt

In one of my poetry books, this is a poem by William Wordsworth titled:
A Change in the Year
IT is the first mild day of March:
             Each minute sweeter than before
             The redbreast sings from the tall larch
             That stands beside our door.

             There is a blessing in the air,
             Which seems a sense of joy to yield
             To the bare trees, and mountains bare,
             And grass in the green field.

But, then I found it's from the original poem "To My Sister". The rest of it is worth reading.....beautiful!

Jennifer: I thought of your PUSSY WILLOWS with this one:

Slumber in Spring
Grey pussy willows
For fairy pillows, So soft for fairy's head;
Cherry-petals sweet
For a cool, clean sheet,
Green moss for a fairy bed.
Fragrant violet for a coverlet.
And hush! down the hill's green sweep,
Comes the wind's soft sigh
For a lullaby;
Sound, sound will a fairy sleep.
     ~Elizabeth Gould

__________________
Suzanne in ID
Wife to Pete
Mom of 7 (Girls - 14, 12, 11, 9, 7 and Boys - 4, 1)
Back to Top View SuzanneG's Profile Search for other posts by SuzanneG
 
SeaStar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: Sept 16 2006
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 9066
Posted: March 12 2009 at 6:56am | IP Logged Quote SeaStar

Interestingly, John Updike also wrote a book of seasonal poems for children (sorry- couldn't find a link for Amazon, but my library has it).
We really enjoy them, but I think our favorite is


August

The sprinklers twirl
The summer wanes
The pavement wears
Popsicle stains

The playground grass
Is worn to dust
The weary swings
Creak, creak with rust.

The trees are bored
With being green.
Some people leave
The local scene

And go to seaside
Bungalows
And take off nearly
All their clothes.


Doesn't that just sum up August? And we get a giggle from the last verse...it always leads to more talk of bathing suits and swimming (also a good chance to review modest swimming attire )

__________________
Melinda, mom to ds ('02) and dd ('04)


SQUILT Music Appreciation
Back to Top View SeaStar's Profile Search for other posts by SeaStar
 
MaryM
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Avatar

Joined: Feb 11 2005
Location: Colorado
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 13104
Posted: April 16 2009 at 2:02am | IP Logged Quote MaryM

Found this lovely, lovely new book - The Cuckoo's Haiku, which has several Haiku poems for each season - all based on birds.

Example from Spring:

     windowsill dove nest
all month, no breeze comes inside
     we wait to be hatched


(about Morning Doves)

__________________
Mary M. in Denver

Our Domestic Church
Back to Top View MaryM's Profile Search for other posts by MaryM Visit MaryM's Homepage
 
Sarah M
Forum All-Star
Forum All-Star


Joined: Jan 06 2008
Location: Washington
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 1423
Posted: April 16 2009 at 10:13am | IP Logged Quote Sarah M

Our Spring poetry:

Hurt No Living Thing by Christina Rosetti
Hurt no living thing;
Ladybird, nor butterfly,
Nor moth with dusty wing,
Nor cricket chirping cheerily,
Nor grasshopper so light of leap,
Nor dancing gnat, nor beetle fat,
Nor harmless worms that creep.

I'm Glad the Sky is Painted Blue (anonymous)
I'm glad the sky is painted blue,
and the earth is painted green,
with such a lot of nice fresh air
All sandwiched in between.
Back to Top View Sarah M's Profile Search for other posts by Sarah M
 
MaryM
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Avatar

Joined: Feb 11 2005
Location: Colorado
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 13104
Posted: May 02 2009 at 1:18am | IP Logged Quote MaryM

MAY IN BLOOM
May is so beautiful:
Orchards are fair;
Branches of fruit trees
Make gardens of air.

Flowers of fragrance
Bloom in the light;
Fall like the snowflakes
Showering white.

Orchards of heaven
Grow with a grace,
And like a blessing
Perfume the place.

Each tree in blossom,
Each lovely spray,
In this month of Our Lady,
Bring glory to May.

Helen Maring
The Magnificat. Volume LXVIII. Number 1. May 1941.



THE MONTH OF MARY
Blooming flowers and singing birds
Hail the month of May;
The springing leaves and sunshine
Fairest tributes pay.

Every little bright-winged bird
Its sweet story sings;
Every flower and blossom
Richest perfume flings.

And every leaf upon the trees,
Every dewdrop fair,
Every whisper, hushed, and still,
Of sweet summer air,

Tells the same soft pleading story
To Mary, full of grace -
How her children so far from her,
Long to see her face.

Anonymous
The Catholic Record. Volume 5. May 1873


These are just a sample of the May poetry for Mary found here.



__________________
Mary M. in Denver

Our Domestic Church
Back to Top View MaryM's Profile Search for other posts by MaryM Visit MaryM's Homepage
 
SuzanneG
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Avatar

Joined: June 17 2006
Location: Idaho
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 5465
Posted: June 24 2009 at 12:32am | IP Logged Quote SuzanneG

Here are a couple summer poems that we're working on:

OUR FLAG    ~Author Unknown
You may call it an old piece of bunting;
You may call it an old tattered rag;
But thousands have died for its honor
And shed their best blood for the flag.

You may call it an old piece of bunting;
You may call it an old tattered rag;
But Freedom has made it majestic,
And Time has ennobled Our Flag.

ANTS
I like to watch the ants at work
When I am out at play.
I like to see them run about
And carry crumbs away.

And when I plug an anthill door
To keep them in their den,
I like to see them find a way
To get outside again.
     ~Mary Ann Hoberman

GRASSHOPPER GREEN
       ~Nancy Dingman Watson
Grasshopper green
Too quick to be seen
Jump like a Mexican jumpity bean!

Grasshopper high
Grasshopper low
Over my basket of berries you go!

Grasshopper low
Grasshopper high
Watch it or you will end up in a pie!
    

WINDOW BOXES
    ~Eleanor Farjeon
A window box of pansies
Is such a happy thing.
A window box of wallflowers
Is a garden for a king.
A window box of roses
Makes everyone stand still
Who sees a garden growing
On a window sill.
(The old Dutch clock it told me so,
And that is how I came to know.)

THE DANDELIONS
Some young and saucy dandelions
Stood laughing in the sun;
They were brimming full of happiness,
And running o'er with fun.

They stretched their necks so slender
To stare up to the sky;
They frolicked with the bumble-bee,
And teased a butterfly

At length they saw beside them
A dandelion old;
His form was bent and withered,
Gone were his looks of gold.

“Oh, Oh!” they cried, “just see him;
“Old greybeard, howd'ye do? “
We'd hide our heads in the grasses,
If we were as bald as you.”

So they mocked the poor old fellow,
Till night came on apace;
Then a cunning little green night-cap
Hid each tiny face.

But, lo! when dawned the morning,
Up rose each tiny head,
Decked not with golden tresses,
But long grey locks instead.


__________________
Suzanne in ID
Wife to Pete
Mom of 7 (Girls - 14, 12, 11, 9, 7 and Boys - 4, 1)
Back to Top View SuzanneG's Profile Search for other posts by SuzanneG
 
SylviaB
Forum Pro
Forum Pro


Joined: June 19 2008
Location: Ohio
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 288
Posted: July 10 2009 at 7:59am | IP Logged Quote SylviaB

Any favorite short summer poems for little ones?
Back to Top View SylviaB's Profile Search for other posts by SylviaB
 

Page of 3 Next >>
  [Add this topic to My Favorites] Post ReplyPost New Topic
Printable version Printable version

Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot create polls in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Hosting and Support provided by theNetSmith.com