Oh, Dearest Mother, Sweetest Virgin of Altagracia, our Patroness. You are our Advocate and to you we recommend our needs. You are our Teacher and like disciples we come to learn from the example of your holy life. You are our Mother, and like children, we come to offer you all of the love of our hearts. Receive, dearest Mother, our offerings and listen attentively to our supplications. Amen.



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Angel
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Posted: June 18 2008 at 12:35pm | IP Logged Quote Angel

Can someone explain to me what goes into making an "Ignatian education"?

I haven't quite been able to wrap my mind around it.

Thanks!

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Willa
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Posted: June 19 2008 at 10:14am | IP Logged Quote Willa

There is a synopsis here in PDF.

I wrote some articles about different aspects of the method for the Kolbe newsletter a few years ago, and those are

here (in PDF).

I hope this starts to answer your question! If not, keep asking!

If you want to see the historical, more scholarly side of it, here at Catholic Encyclopedia is a description of the IGnatian Ratio Studiorum

ETA a bit more.

As to what specifically goes into an Ignatian education, Kolbe has one type of curriculum.    The Latin Centered Curriculum has several overlaps too.

I would say that the bottom line with Ignatian education is a focus on classical languages and literature, plus a focus on one's own language's literature and particularly in the arts of expression -- speaking, writing, recitation, drama.   This language and expression components are at the heart of it, I think.

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Posted: June 20 2008 at 5:49am | IP Logged Quote mariB

Thank you, Willa. I am printing out some of these articles you wrote to put in my home school notebook! Just enrolled our two highschoolers in Kolbe. (Actually, you sold me on Kolbe as I read through some threads..and of course other ladies at 4real did too!)

We've done a lot of MODG but wanted more help in high school. I was very attracted by the Ignatian education as we have basically fallen into it by accident. We have a very Latin centered curriculum and my kids like classical literature.

Off to make a real study of Ignatian education:)

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Posted: June 11 2009 at 9:12am | IP Logged Quote BrendaPeter

Willa wrote:
There is a synopsis here in PDF.

I wrote some articles about different aspects of the method for the Kolbe newsletter a few years ago, and those are

here (in PDF).





With your background Willa, I'd love to know what you think of the Classical Liberal Arts Academy? I think you'd find the discussions in the Family Forum very interesting.

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Willa
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Posted: June 11 2009 at 10:03am | IP Logged Quote Willa

BrendaPeter wrote:
With your background Willa, I'd love to know what you think of the Classical Liberal Arts Academy? I think you'd find the discussions in the Family Forum very interesting.


Wow, thanks for linking to them, Brenda. I had been following topics about CLAA on my various classical lists but didn't know about the Family Forum. I'll definitely be checking it out.


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Posted: June 11 2009 at 11:06am | IP Logged Quote BrendaPeter

Willa wrote:
BrendaPeter wrote:
With your background Willa, I'd love to know what you think of the Classical Liberal Arts Academy? I think you'd find the discussions in the Family Forum very interesting.


Wow, thanks for linking to them, Brenda. I had been following topics about CLAA on my various classical lists but didn't know about the Family Forum. I'll definitely be checking it out.


Oh good! You might want to join us over here for a discussion on the Schwickerath book.

What other classical lists are out there besides the LCC one?

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Willa
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Posted: June 11 2009 at 12:24pm | IP Logged Quote Willa

Brenda wrote:
What other classical lists are out there besides the LCC one?


The one I run is the Catholic Classical Education group -- for Catholics who abide by the teachings of the Magisterium.

The other one I belong to is the Trivium at Home group. It's an ecumenical list, for anyone who abides by the Apostles' Creed.

They both seem to be a bit quiet right now compared to LCC but they both have very rich archives.

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Posted: June 12 2009 at 12:25pm | IP Logged Quote BrendaPeter

fyi - there is a new & improved CLAA Forum but I recommend going to the original one to get "caught up" so to speak. Not sure if the old stuff will be archived.

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Posted: June 20 2009 at 11:35am | IP Logged Quote Willa

You asked me what I thought of the CLAA, Brenda. I guess I'm waiting to see how it all shakes down! It's pretty new.

I've been reading the Schwickerath book on Jesuit Education and it's very interesting... challenging though. I recommend it if you want to really know the ins and outs of this form of education.   I wish it had been available a few years ago -- it's the most helpful book I've read on the subject so far.

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Posted: June 20 2009 at 1:45pm | IP Logged Quote stefoodie

Willa -- tried to PM you -- says your box is full!

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Posted: June 23 2009 at 7:39am | IP Logged Quote BrendaPeter

Willa wrote:
I've been reading the Schwickerath book on Jesuit Education and it's very interesting... challenging though. I recommend it if you want to really know the ins and outs of this form of education.   I wish it had been available a few years ago -- it's the most helpful book I've read on the subject so far.


Oh no! If YOU says it's challenging... Hoping to start it this week. I'm also planning to have Staples print out the Ratio Studiorum for me.

Well, my oldest (15) starts Dialectic & Humanities soon so pray for us! The other kids are enrolled in Grammar, Catechism, World Chronology, & Vocabulary. We've got alot of summer activities going on so we've only delved into Grammar so far. The discipline required is quite intense but it's something they can really sink their teeth into so they like the challenge. Time will tell how it goes...

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Willa
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Posted: June 23 2009 at 11:42am | IP Logged Quote Willa

BrendaPeter wrote:
Oh no! If YOU says it's challenging... Hoping to start it this week.


I didn't say it very well -- I didn't mean so much hard to read, he seems quite accessible to me, in some ways easier to read than say Charlotte Mason -- but difficult in that the Ratio was so dependent upon a tradition of intellectual and spiritual formation. I don't have that and neither does anyone I know, not even most modern Jesuits (sorry to say it). So I have to strain my brain to figure out how these methods can be implemented in some way in my homeschool.   That's where the challenging part is -- maybe I should have said "convicting".   We're certainly standing in the ruins a bit, I think.

Sorry about the inbox, Stef -- it's clear now


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Posted: June 23 2009 at 11:47am | IP Logged Quote Willa

I didn't want to sound overly pessimistic though.

Kolbe Academy, and Father Fessio (an orthodox and scholarly Jesuit) and the late Father Hardon (another orthodox and scholarly Jesuit) were/are all huge proponents of Catholic homeschooling and saw hsing as a sort of herald of brighter times coming for Catholic education.

It's odd, isn't it, to be part of a thing like homeschooling whose ramifications we don't fully understand.

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Posted: June 23 2009 at 10:35pm | IP Logged Quote Maggie

Ladies,

I am so very interested in this discussion. My husband and I are naturally drawn to classical education...but at the same time...(bear with me, as I have not actually home-schooled seriously yet)...it seems a bit dry? But I see a value in the method...

So...

How does one mesh the Ignatian Method with Charlotte Mason?

I'm a newbie when it comes to all this...but I am open ears.

Maggie

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Posted: June 24 2009 at 5:04am | IP Logged Quote BrendaPeter

Willa wrote:
   I don't have that and neither does anyone I know, not even most modern Jesuits (sorry to say it). So I have to strain my brain to figure out how these methods can be implemented in some way in my homeschool.   That's where the challenging part is -- maybe I should have said "convicting".   We're certainly standing in the ruins a bit, I think.


Yep. I KNOW I don't have it either. God willing, CLAA will be able to provide a chunk of it for my children (in a big part, due to the advancement of technology) and, the amazing side benefit, is that I'll be learning in the process.

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Posted: June 24 2009 at 5:08am | IP Logged Quote BrendaPeter

Willa wrote:

Kolbe Academy, and Father Fessio (an orthodox and scholarly Jesuit) and the late Father Hardon (another orthodox and scholarly Jesuit) were/are all huge proponents of Catholic homeschooling and saw hsing as a sort of herald of brighter times coming for Catholic education.


That is VERY interesting, especially considering the HOW? Moms would have to be educated this way to begin with in order to provide for their children. I'm confused about Kolbe as their curriculum resembles a more modern educational path, so where is the resemblence to what the Jesuits were doing?

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Posted: June 24 2009 at 10:53am | IP Logged Quote stacykay

Jumping into this awfully late, but I have been reading all (thanks for the all wonderful info, Willa!,) because this Ignatian approach is what drew me to Kolbe when we first began hs'ing. (But I never stuck with just Kolbe-tweaker that I am. )

I can't speak for all Jesuit education, just my ds's high school, but here is a little of how some Jesuits are trying to work at emphasizing the Ignatian method in their school.
First, they have been working on getting their staff to go on pilgramage to Spain and Rome to "follow the footsteps" of St. Ignatius of Loyola. They also have all go on an Ignatian retreat/s.
The president(of the school) has written how hard they are working to teach their staff the tools to bring the Ignatian method to the classroom and to the boys.

The past few years (we have only been there four) they have also set up retreats and evenings of reflection and information for parents to learn and incorporate St. Ignatius' methods of prayer and living into our daily lives.

The boys all have a time of Ignatian review set into their day, when everyone stops and they pray and reflect.

This is just an aside, but I got teary-eyed hearing about it:
On my ds's last day of school, all of the senior boys (166) met on the common field in front of the school, hooting and hollering, and then, they all quieted and said the pray of St. Ignatius together. Their president, a Jesuit priest, said it was so emotional to hear them all, praying, and that it was so loud, it could be heard through the whole neighborhood.

Oh, and everything, from their papers to those rubber wristbands teens wear, have AMDG on them.

I am working at putting more of St. Ignatius into this coming school year! Very excited!!!

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Posted: June 24 2009 at 5:45pm | IP Logged Quote Willa

BrendaPeter wrote:
That is VERY interesting, especially considering the HOW? Moms would have to be educated this way to begin with in order to provide for their children. I'm confused about Kolbe as their curriculum resembles a more modern educational path, so where is the resemblence to what the Jesuits were doing?


Yes, that is interesting.

Kolbe's highschool curriculum is quite Ignatian in its emphasis on classic literature (no textbooks for history or literature). In religion, the emphasis is divided between classics and systematic treatment of theology.   Science relatively takes a back seat (also a traditional Ignatian way of doing it because sciences were intended to be studied more intensively AFTER the thorough grounding in humanities (literature and language).

I think Kolbe keeps some science in there, adds a recommended modern language and thus dilutes the Latin program partly because most homeschooling parents weren't educated in the ignatian way themselves and partly because of college-prep requirements.

Jesuit education traditionally didn't start until secondary school (or actually, more like our present middle school because the kids entered college at an earlier age than they do now).   So the grade school Kolbe program is more preparatory and the high school is more the heart of the program.

Fr Schwickerath says that the Ratio allows for modifications according to actual circumstances of time and place.   The essence of the method is study of literature for the development of "eloquentia perfecta" -- the ability to speak, write and act well.    Latin and Greek are very important formatively for many reasons but are not strictly speaking essential to the goal.   (Or at least this is what Fr Schwickerath seems to say).

I will be interested in hearing how CLAA works out for you, Brenda!

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Posted: June 24 2009 at 6:20pm | IP Logged Quote BrendaPeter

I do see what you're saying Willa, but it's a far cry from "multa non multum" in my book ! I just see "stuff", get overwhelmed & shut down from there.

Willa wrote:

I will be interested in hearing how CLAA works out for you, Brenda!


You're not kidding!

What I can say at the moment is that it's VERY rigorous and the children will have to develop their study skills to move ahead. I've never been able to help them achieve good study skills in the past. Grades were never a big motivating factor to my typical homeschooled kids (or to me either) but having to get a 100 on a test to master the material & move ahead is making a difference. It's the 1st time with any program (yes, we've tried them all ) that I'm confidently & strongly encouraging them to focus on their studies because the CONTENT is so incredibly rich and it builds on itself so it is truly necessary to lay the proper foundation.

Oddly enough, a side benefit has been that the time when they're not working on their studies is so much more free. Since their studies are very intense and so rich, I'm much more relaxed about what books they read. I now encourage them to read purely for pleasure or to play a game and relax, so the overall atmosphere in our home has improved as well.

I staggered all their start dates so I'm working with each one individually as I knew the transition would be a challenge. So far, so good. I'll keep you posted!



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