Oh, Dearest Mother, Sweetest Virgin of Altagracia, our Patroness. You are our Advocate and to you we recommend our needs. You are our Teacher and like disciples we come to learn from the example of your holy life. You are our Mother, and like children, we come to offer you all of the love of our hearts. Receive, dearest Mother, our offerings and listen attentively to our supplications. Amen.



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Subject Topic: Civil War - 150 Year Remembrance Ideas Post ReplyPost New Topic
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Mackfam
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Posted: Oct 28 2011 at 10:51am | IP Logged Quote Mackfam

A couple more civil war book I recently discovered:

Hands of Mercy: The Story of Sister-Nurses in the Civil War by Norah Smaridge (1960) oop, Banner Books

Armorer of the Confederacy: Secretary Mallory by Rev. Joseph Durkin (1960) oop, Banner Books. You can read some good background at the Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial site on Secretary Mallory.

Both books are listed as appropriate for 9+ through teens.

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JennGM
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Posted: Oct 28 2011 at 2:00pm | IP Logged Quote JennGM

Ah Jen, I have had a list I was going to share -- you jogged my memory. These are from the Catholic series, so these would be chapter books that touch on the Civil War. The two you mention are also included:

Banner Books by Benziger Brothers
*Armorer of the Confederacy: Secretary Stephen R. Mallory by Joseph T Durkin
*Hands of Mercy: The Story of Sister Nurses in the Civil War by Norah Smaridge

Vision Books
*Frances Warde and the First Sisters of Mercy by Sister Marie Christopher, R.S.M.

American Background Books by P.J. Kenedy & Sons
*General Phil Sheridan And The Union Cavalry by Milton Lomask
*Margaret Haughery: Bread Woman of New Orleans by Flora Strousse
*John Hughes: Eagle of the Church by Doran Hurley
*Rose Greenhow: Confederate Secret Agent by Dorothy Fremont Grant
*Raphael Semmes Confederate Admiral by Robert W. Daly
*Chaplain in Gray: Abram Ryan, Poet-Priest of the Confederacy by Harold Jerome Heagney

Catholic Treasury Books by Bruce Publishing
*Hand Raised at Gettysburg by Harold and Grace Johnson
*Amazing John Tabb by Eva K. Betz
*Charity Goes to War by Anne Heagney
*The Web Begun Civil War novel by Eva K. Betz

Credo Books by Hawthorn Books
*Forked Lightning: The Story of General Philip H. Sheridan by Albert Orbaan


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JennGM
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Posted: Nov 07 2011 at 6:43pm | IP Logged Quote JennGM

Did you see Homeschool Connections is having a Civil War course for 6-8th graders beginning in January?

It looks TERRIFIC!!!!!!!

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Mackfam
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Posted: Nov 07 2011 at 8:20pm | IP Logged Quote Mackfam

The Civil War Today app for iPad.

I wish I had an iPad just for this app. This app sends daily emails of "news" as if it is happening real time that mirrors what was happening in the Civil War on that day 150 years ago. Experience the Civil War as it unfolds, one day at a time.

From iTunes:
Quote:
The Civil War Today includes:
• Daily Civil War updates from April 12, 2011 through April 26, 2015. The app content updates ONE DAY AT A TIME, precisely mirroring the events of 150 years ago
• “In the Headlines” featuring newspapers from every day of the war.
• Running tallies of the North and South casualty counts.
• “A Day in the Life” with personal letters and diary entries from 15 individuals including Abraham Lincoln, Horatio Nelson Taft, and Mary Boykin Miller Chesnut.
• Photo of the day and photo galleries.
• Quote of the day.
• Articles and video on featured topics.
• Authentic period maps from key battlegrounds.
• Daily North-South quiz.
• Detailed background scenes that put you in the time and place of the Civil War. (Northern city, Southern plantation, Western frontier town, military camp).
• Twitter integration to send a telegram via morse code.
• GameCenter integration to earn Civil War era appropriate achievements – and display them in a virtual medals case.
• Airplay integration for viewing of app video via Apple TV.
• Advanced multi-finger gesture functionality and custom toolbar for deep navigation.


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Grace&Chaos
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Posted: Nov 10 2011 at 3:05pm | IP Logged Quote Grace&Chaos

Just in case any of you live near the Ventura County area in CA there will be re-enactments this weekend (rain or shine): The Blue and The Gray

We will be hearing canons all weekend

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Cay Gibson
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Posted: Nov 10 2011 at 9:09pm | IP Logged Quote Cay Gibson

I just started reading Sarah Morgan: The Civil War Diary of a Southern Woman edited by Charles East.

Not sure yet what ages it's appropriate for but I enjoyed it as soon as I began reading it and it's a real diary. I love "real" stories. Several books have done a tremendous job of recording history but nothing can replace the tale of history written by a person who was actually living it in that very minute.

It's that old "Did that really happen?" question when the answer makes you sit back with a contented sigh.

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Posted: March 05 2012 at 1:30am | IP Logged Quote MaryM

Jenn mentioned to me that this week is the anniversary date of the Battle of the Ironclads - the Monitor and the Merrimack - March 9, 1862.

Adding a picture book on the topic for this week.

Duel of the Ironclads: The Monitor vs. The Virginia (Patrick O’Brien)


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Posted: March 05 2012 at 7:32pm | IP Logged Quote JennGM

MaryM wrote:
Jenn mentioned to me that this week is the anniversary date of the Battle of the Ironclads - the Monitor and the Merrimack - March 9, 1862.

Adding a picture book on the topic for this week.

Duel of the Ironclads: The Monitor vs. The Virginia (Patrick O’Brien)


My sons LOVED this one!

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Kristen in TN
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Posted: March 10 2012 at 7:17pm | IP Logged Quote Kristen in TN

Forgive me if these have already been posted. I glanced through the lists and didn't see them.

Confederate Alphabet by Rickey E. Pittman

Jim Limber Davis A Black Orphan in the Confederate White House by Rickey Pittman

The Story of the H.L. Hunley and Queenie's Coin

And a chapter book:
Armorer of the Confederacy Secretary Mallory by Rev. Josph T. Durkin S.J. (Benzinger Bros. Banner Book). It's an oldy, but a goody.

One that I haven't read yet, but recently purchased from Mother Angelica's shrine store is Angels of the Battlefield by George Barton. It says "A History of the Labors of the Catholic Sisterhoods in the Late Civil War. This is a reprint of an 1897 book.

I could probably catalog more. We have an extensive library since my boys have been "into" the War Between the States for at least 8 years now, probably a little longer.

God bless,
Kristen in TN

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Posted: March 10 2012 at 8:57pm | IP Logged Quote Mackfam

MaryM wrote:
How about favorite Civil War poetry?

We're studying Walt Whitman this term as our poet, and have found it very interesting how very involved he was in the Civil War. He never fought in the war, but his compassionate efforts and care of the wounded and dying were extraordinary. His younger brother fought for the Union, and when he was injured, Walt went to find him in a field hospital and stayed with him until he was well. At that point, Walt felt that his presence was really helpful to the many men and boys wounded and dying in the hospitals, so he stayed in Washington D.C. hospitals, taking little jobs here and there to try to support himself so he could stay.

Whitman recounts and describes his hospital role:
Walt Whitman wrote:
I supply often to some of these dear, suffering boys in my presence and magnetism that which doctors nor medicines nor skills nor routine assistance can give. I can testify that friendship has literally cured a fever and the medicine of daily affection, a bad wound.

He wrote an entire book's worth of poetry describing his experiences of the Civil War, entitled, Drum Taps. Many of the poems were inspired by the young men who would recount their experiences as Walt sat in vigil next to their bedside. He would faithfully record notes in his little notebook, and then compose poetry as a way of giving voice to those experiences.

There are many books that go into Walt Whitman's involvement in the Civil War. Our favorite, and most appropriate for a variety of ages, is Walt Whitman: Words For America. It's a fantastic picture book, beautifully illustrated by Brian Selznick, that offers a fantastic introduction to Mr. Whitman and his poetry.

Mr. Whitman's great respect for President Lincoln provides a kinship between the two men, and when President Lincoln is assassinated, Mr. Whitman wrote, O Captain!, my Captain! as a tribute. It's a haunting poem illustrating just how much respect Walt Whitman had for President Lincoln and the leadership he offered the country through some of its darkest hours, as well as how the country was just beginning to heal. It would make an excellent poem to memorize as part of the study. Though O Captain! my Captain! was the poem that really thrust Walt Whitman's poetry into more popular light and is most often associated with the assassination of President Lincoln, it was the poem, When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloom'd that Whitman preferred as a fitting eulogy for the fallen President.

An excerpt:
Quote:
Coffin that passes through lanes and streets,     
Through day and night, with the great cloud darkening the land,     
With the pomp of the inloop’d flags, with the cities draped in black,     
With the show of the States themselves, as of crape-veil’d women, standing,     
With processions long and winding, and the flambeaus of the night,     
With the countless torches lit—with the silent sea of faces, and the unbared heads,     
With the waiting depot, the arriving coffin, and the sombre faces,     
With dirges through the night, with the thousand voices rising strong and solemn;
With all the mournful voices of the dirges, pour’d around the coffin,     
The dim-lit churches and the shuddering organs—Where amid these you journey,     
With the tolling, tolling bells’ perpetual clang;     
Here! coffin that slowly passes,     
I give you my sprig of lilac.


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Posted: March 14 2012 at 10:28pm | IP Logged Quote Kristen in TN

For poetry we have a book called War Songs and Poems of the Southern Confederacy written by "an ex-Confederate." It was originally written in 1904, but the copy we have was reproduced by Castle Books in 2000.

The song that this book doesn't contain is one of our favorites. It tells the story of the beginning of the War when the Confederates were doing better. In the lyrics are found clever uses of words and if you know the history of that time period, you get more out of the song. The name of the song is "Richmond is a Hard Road to Travel." Here is the link to the song and some of the explinations can be found on that website as well.

God bless,
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Posted: March 15 2012 at 2:11am | IP Logged Quote MaryM

Loving the poetry recommendations! Thanks.

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Posted: March 23 2012 at 2:25am | IP Logged Quote MaryM

MaryM wrote:
Jenn mentioned to me that this week is the anniversary date of the Battle of the Ironclads - the Monitor and the Merrimack - March 9, 1862.


Drat...I didn't run acrros this comic in time for the anniversary earlier in the month - but Treasure Chest of Fact & Fun (the Catholic comic book series I often rave about!) had this story in one of its issues: Battle of the Ironclads

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Posted: May 30 2012 at 1:39pm | IP Logged Quote MaryM

A little late as we already celebrated Memorial Day earlier this week, but it bears mentioning and adding to the discussion. The decorating of graves of the war dead in US is generally considered to have come about during or immediately following the Civil War. There are competing stories as to which town or group of woman are first responsible for the idea of honoring the Civil War dead by decorating graves and many different places claim that distinction.

Accordng to the stories, a lawyer in Ithaca, N.Y., named Francis Miles Finch read about the gesture of decorating both Confederate and Union graves and wrote a poem about the ceremony. The poem, “The Blue and the Gray,” was published in The Atlantic Monthly in 1867.

By the flow of an inland river,
When the fleets of iron have fled
Where the blades of the grave grass quiver,
Asleep are the ranks of the dead.

Under the sod and the dew
Waiting the judgment day
Under the one the Blue,
Under the other the Gray.

From the silence of sorrowful hearts
The desolate mourners go,
Lovingly laden with flowers
Alike, for the friend and the foe.

Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment day;
Under the roses, the Blue,
Under the lilies, the Gray.

Sadly, but not with upbraiding,
The generous deed was done.
In the storms of the years that are fading,
No braver battle was won.

Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment day;
Under the blossoms, the Blue,
Under the garlands, the Gray.

No more shall the war cry sever
Or the winding rivers be red;
They banish our anger forever
When they laurel the graves of our dead.

Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting for Judgment day
Love and tears for the Blue,
Tears and love for the Gray.




Memorial Day (or Decoration Day as it was called then) was officially proclaimed on May 5, 1868 by General John Logan and was first observed on May 30, 1868 when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.

A thread with some other poems of Civil War remembrances of the dead - Poems for Memorial Day

Picture book recommendation:
Arlington: The Story of Our Nation's Cemetery (Chris Demarest)

It tells the story of Arlington National Cemetery, from the time it was open land inherited by George Washington Parke Custiss, step grandson of Geroge Washington to becoming the final resting place of tens of thousands of military men and women and prominent Americans. It is really well done and I found it fascinating reading. The illustrations are also beautiful, very captivating. Truly a worthy addition to Memorial Day reading and study. Highly recommended.




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Posted: May 30 2012 at 2:12pm | IP Logged Quote MaryM

I am loving the vintage postcard art I'm finding. Fun art addition to this rabbit trail.









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Posted: June 07 2012 at 10:06am | IP Logged Quote MaryM

Copied from another thread.

Tina P. wrote:
I just thought I'd share a cool timeline I found that really clarifies what happens when during the Civil War.

Civil War Timeline


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Posted: Aug 25 2012 at 5:18pm | IP Logged Quote JennGM

This weekend Manassas is celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Second Battle of Bull Run or Manassas.

Last night we walked through the cemetery for a short tour. There was a reenactor and to hear the stories about the cemetery and people -- so cool. I'll have to go back during the day to take better pictures of the stones. There is also a Confederate "Iron Cross" that was awarded. Want to find out more about that -- but there are some in our cemetery.

Going to the Civil War Reenactor Parade. It was great fun last year! Hoping the rain holds off or is at least light. Very grateful we're not having the heat wave of last year.

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Posted: Sept 20 2012 at 9:22am | IP Logged Quote MaryM

Chris recommended a Civil War iPad app here.

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Posted: Nov 15 2012 at 12:30am | IP Logged Quote MaryM

So next week, November 19 is the 149th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address (which means next year is the 150th). There is an old picture book from 1947 that is being republished in February. I just read an original edition of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address by James Daugherty. Illustrations are really dynamic.

Quote:
James Daugherty (1887 -1974) was an American modernist painter whose canvases hang in the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney & the Smithsonian. In London he read Walt Whitman and became excited about catching in visual images the poet's dynamic concept of America. About 1915 began Daugherty's long absorption in color abstraction. He was a pivotal member of the Sychromist movement in American modernism and as such, had a retrospective show at the Schoelkopf Gallery in NYC in 1971. After 1920 and into the 1930's Daugherty turned to mural paintings portraying vibrant themes from American history. He then turned to illustrating children's books and has more than 50 to his credit and the authorship of a dozen.


Here is a sample page from the book.


You can read and see the book online here.

Other juvenile book depictions of the Gettysburg Address:
The Gettysburg Address illustrated by Michael McCurdy
The Story of the Gettysburg Address (Cornerstones of Freedom) by Kenneth Richards

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Posted: Nov 23 2012 at 11:03pm | IP Logged Quote MaryM

In preparation for the 150th of the Emancipation Proclamation (Jan. 1, 1863):


Issue Date: January 21, 2013

There is also an older postage stamp issued in 1963 for the centennial.


Picture books:
Ben and the Emancipation Proclamation (Pat Sherman)
The Listeners (Gloria Whelan) - which is really set earlier , when Lincoln is elected, but alludes to the future and the slave children continuing to listen fro news.

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